School police force earn their badges ahead of new school year

By Wesley LeBlanc Staff Writer
Posted 8/7/19

FLEMING ISLAND – Officers with the Clay County School District Police Department officers officially began their watch following an induction ceremony on Aug. 1.

Although they’ve officially …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for subscribing.

Single day pass

You also have the option of purchasing 24 hours of access, for $1.00. Click here to purchase a single day pass.

School police force earn their badges ahead of new school year

Posted

FLEMING ISLAND – Officers with the Clay County School District Police Department officers officially began their watch following an induction ceremony on Aug. 1.

Although they’ve officially been on the clock for more than two months, 46 officers earned their badges following training ahead of the new school year.

And despite the department having only been around for less than six months, Chief Kenneth Wagner vowed his department will set the standard for efficiency in the state.

“With the help of many – I knew back then that I was going to create the best school police department in the state of Florida,” Wagner said.

It was a night for celebration in the Teacher In-Service Training Center at Fleming Island High, a room usually reserved for board motions and public discourse.

With a collective total of 961 years of law enforcement service, and dozens of years in military service, Wagner said he’s humbled by the men and women he’ll be working with in district schools.

Some officers came from other counties and other states. Some left military police units to join this department. Others came from neighboring departments.

A handful of officers retired from JSO years ago, became guardians for the school district last year and donned an officer uniform once more to serve the district’s children.

Regardless of where they came from, getting to this point wasn’t easy.

Wagner said his officers trained in emergency vehicle operations, use-of-force, qualifications of handguns and rifles, active shooter and active assailant emergencies, safe crisis management, Florida law, mental health and first aid, de-escalation training and school familiarity.

“These are the most capable men and women to protect our district’s children,” Wagner said. “I get to lead this great work and I have great optimism of what we’re going to move forward with. I’m really at a loss of words. This is such a momentous night.”

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment