Levine first call on NFL injury watch list

By Randy Lefko
Posted 12/27/17

FLEMING ISLAND – On the NFL field of play, things happen in an instant and, at times, injuries to players happen just as fast.

In a small corner of the sideline is a TV monitor, a headset, a …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for subscribing.

Single day pass

You also have the option of purchasing 24 hours of access, for $1.00. Click here to purchase a single day pass.

Levine first call on NFL injury watch list

Posted

FLEMING ISLAND – On the NFL field of play, things happen in an instant and, at times, injuries to players happen just as fast.

In a small corner of the sideline is a TV monitor, a headset, a phone and Fleming Island High graduate Corey Levine ready to do his job. “There are two spotters in the press box above the field and when plays happen that an injury occurs, I get a phone call to snag the video,” said Levine, who works as an Injury Video Review Technician for the National Football League. “As fast as injuries happen, I kind of slow it down so the doctors can see how the injury happened and how extensive it may be.”

Levine, a graduate of Fleming Island High School in 2014, has always been around the area’s two YMCA sports programs and credits his interest in sports from that experience.

“I am the sports program director for both YMCA’s Barco-Newton and Dye Clay,” said Levine, who is at St. Johns River Community College to pursue a sports management degree at the University of North Florida. “It’s funny how coming from that, a non-profit experience, to working for the NFL, is a big difference in pay. I even got to go to London for four days.”

Levine noted that he has not seen any traumatic injuries in his post, but that sometimes athletes will get hurt, but instinct puts them back on their feet and in play.

“When we see a guy got hit hard, maybe he wobbles when he gets up, but noone notices, we get a doctor to look at the play on video and make an assessment,” said Levine, who also is as assistant coach for Fleming Island High girls basketball with Joey Williams. “Players want to play, but our job is to protect them.”

Although Levine’s NFL day is a long day, starting at 8:30 a,m, Sunday’s and leaving around 6:30 p.m., it’s a nice gig.

“Look where I am on the field,” said Levine. “Most times, I get to just watch the game and make sure the equipment is working. We’ve been lucky that we haven’t had a rain game. That might make it interesting.”

With the Jaguars in the NFL playoffs, Levine has a few more weeks of work and is awaiting for notice on the upcoming Pro Bowl game in Orlando where crews from either Tampa or Jacksonville will man the video equipment.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment