Crime report a mixed bag for Clay County

By Joshua Torres For Clay Today
Posted 12/5/18

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – The world is not a scary place or at least it’s not as scary as many people try to portray it as, if the Semi-Annual Uniform Crime Report from the Florida Department of Law …

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Crime report a mixed bag for Clay County

Posted

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – The world is not a scary place or at least it’s not as scary as many people try to portray it as, if the Semi-Annual Uniform Crime Report from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement is any indication.

The report shows Florida’s crime volume dropped eight percent, or 24,564 fewer reported index crimes, compared to the first six months of 2017

“In Florida, families expect to be able to find a great job, ensure their kids get a top-notch education, and live in a safe and strong community,” said Gov. Rick Scott in a press release.

Violent crimes have especially seen a drop with an almost 7 percent decrease in the first half of the year. One big thing that has dropped is the amount of domestic violence incidents, which dropped about 1.5 percent.

Domestic violence, particularly assault, is one crime that in Florida that has for the last 5 years stayed fairly consistent, with about 85,000 cases reported every year. But here in Clay County it is an offense that has dropped at a slower rate.

The worst year being 2014 when there were 814 reported offenses of domestic assault but only cases led to an arrest. In 2017, Clay County hit a new low in reported offenses of domestic assault with 617 but 524 of those cases lead to arrest.

So, why were there almost 200 less reported offenses than in 2014 but over double the amount of arrests.

Ana Martinez-Mullen, CEO of Quigley House in Clay County, said she believes it’s a change in culture and how people view these crimes.

“The more educated people are and the fact that they realize that we are moving away from domestic violence happening behind closed doors,” said Martinez-Mullen.

Martinez-Mullen said that people are not just “turning a blind eye” when they see or hear a domestic incident happening. They are reporting it and making sure that the victims in the case are getting the proper help they need to move forward.

Martinez-Mullen, who worked in Jacksonville at the Hubbard House, praised the Clay County leadership and the community as a whole for the support that Quigley House receives.

“Clay County, they are very very generous with our agency and survivors,” said Martinez-Mullen “We are very lucky to have that and to have the support not only of the residents but also businesses in the community and civic leaders.”

When it comes down to it, it is true that we are moving in to a time period unlike any that we have ever seen in history. We are living in a time when people are taking a stand because they are tired of seeing people who want to do wrong get away with it.

The concept of “see something, say something” has also helped law enforcement identify problems that may have otherwise gone unnoticed.

Victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, can contact the Quigley House 24-hour hotline at (904) 284-0061 or 800-339-5017 for help.

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